A man born without his right hand has become the first recipient of a bionic arm inspired by hit video game Metal Gear Solid.

Daniel Melville, 29, from Reading, has turned into a "real-life Venom Snake" after being fitted with the red and black prosthetic arm that is based on the main character.

Made by Bristol-based company Open Bionics, the Metal Gear Solid design is a customised cover on the firm's product – Hero Arm – a light and comfortable multi-grip bionic arm that allows the user to hold cutlery or a pen and even operate machinery.

In the clip shared on YouTube, Daniel is seen fitting the bionic arm and using it to hold a mobile phone.

Daniel Melville is the first person to have fitted a Metal Gear Solid-themed bionic arm
Daniel Melville is the first person to have fitted a Metal Gear Solid-themed bionic arm

The sensor-filled machinery also allows him to pick up tiny objects like a sugar cube.

He says: "This is unbelievable – it's everything I've ever wanted from a bionic arm.

"I'm an avid gamer and love Metal Gear Solid so much and to have Snake's arm in real life is just insane."

Japanese gaming giant Konami, the creator of Metal Gear Solid, has now partnered with Open Bionics to bring Venom Snake's arm to life for Daniel Melville and other upper limb amputees around the world.

The prosthetic arm is modelled based on the one worn by the game character Venom Snake
The prosthetic arm is modelled based on the one worn by the game character Venom Snake

Takayuki Kubo, president of Konami Digital Entertainment, said: "We're incredibly excited to collaborate with Open Bionics, who are at the cutting edge of robotics.

"We're thrilled to see the iconic Metal Gear aesthetic of Venom Snake and his bionic arm burst out of the screen and come to life in a dynamic fusion of technology and design that is changing the lives of upper limb amputees all over the world."

The battery-powered Hero Arms can be fitted with a variety of clip-on magnetic covers and is equipped with sensors that can pick up signals from muscles so that the user can "effortlessly" control the hand with "intuitive life-like precision".