A woman living an an upscale Vancouver apartment block faced the heartbreaking decision of either giving up her flat, or her beloved dog.

Scout, the nine-month-old Golden Retriever mix, is apparently just that little bit too tall to live in the Surry strata housing development.

Rabiya Merani was shocked to receive a letter from the Surrey Strata building’s managers which read: “Your dog is already taller than the bylaw permits (14 inches at the shoulder) and as such the strata council voted that you must remove the dog from the premises.”

Rabiya pleaded with the management company to reconsider their decision but she had no luck.

Rabiya Merani said she was surprised to learn Scout, her nine-month-old Golden Retriever mix, was violating a strata bylaw.
At 14" to the shoulder, Scout is too tall to live in Rabiya's apartment

Speaking to Canadian news service CTV, she pointed out that there are other people living in her building that are breaching the rules – either by having a dog that’s roughly the same height as Scout or, in some cases, having multiple dogs.

One of Rabiya’s neighbours, Donna Mitchell, said that the company's rules on pets made no sense to her.

Rabiya Merani said she was surprised to learn Scout, her nine-month-old Golden Retriever mix, was violating a strata bylaw.
Rabiya says she knows of other people living in her block with 'illegal' pets

“You can have a small dog that's quite disruptive and a large dog that's quiet and doesn't cause any issue, so I think it's discriminatory against people where they can live and where they can't, based on the size of their dog,”

Donna, who has lived in the block for over 10 years, added that there are other residents with dogs the same size as Scout, and more than one with two dogs.

Rabiya Merani said she was surprised to learn Scout, her nine-month-old Golden Retriever mix, was violating a strata bylaw.
She described the letter as 'heartbreaking'

None of them, she notes, are being asked to choose between their home and their pet.

For her part, Rabiya has given up hope of reaching a compromise. She’s already looking for a new place to live but says she wanted to go public with her dilemma to raise awareness of what she says is a very unfair situation: “I want to make sure that even if I am leaving this place.

"I want to make sure that I leave it in a better place than when I came,” she said.