Andrew "Freddie" Flintoff opened up about his battle with bulimia in BBC documentary Freddie Flintoff: Living with Bulimia.

Behind closed doors, throughout his 20 years in the limelight, Freddie, 42, has been living with bulimia, an eating disorder characterised by bingeing food and purging.

During the programme, the former international cricketer met Pam and her son Chris.

Pam's youngest son Laurence developed bulimia in his late teens and he tragically passed away.

Freddie opened up to them about his battle with the eating disorder.

When asked where he is now with he eating disorder, Freddie answered: "It's a tricky question. Every time I eat, I feel some sort of guilt, and I worry about food and about putting weight on.

Freddie opened up about having bulimia in the BBC documentary

"I think that I'm dictating terms to an eating disorder rather than the other way round if that makes sense."

Freddie continued: "I still feel the compulsion to be sick, but I can control them."

Pam asked him: "If I could say to you, fast-forward your life 20 years from now, do you think you still would have an eating disorder?"

Pam's son Laurence developed bulimia in his late teens and he tragically died

Freddie replied: "Yeah", to which Pam said: "So nothing that way would change."

"Yeah, I think I will," remarked Freddie.

Pam warned him: "It is okay having a mental health issue, it's just making sure that it won't become a fatality."

Freddie revealed in 2014 that he suffered with bulimia during his sporting career.

He described how his struggle with bulimia began when focus was put on his weight during the early part of his international playing days.

Freddie revealed in 2014 that he suffered with bulimia during his sporting career

Flintoff said: "I became known as a fat cricketer. That was horrible. That was when I started doing it.

"That was when I started being sick after meals. Then things started happening for me as a player."

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